Sighting

Matt Campbell 4 Jan 2017

Green-combed Spider Orchid (Caladenia dilatata)

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Sighted 21 Dec 2016
Old Port Walking Trail, Port Albert VIC 3971, Australia

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Identifications

  • Matt Campbell 4 January 2017
    Caladenia
    (genus)
    Taxonomy: Plantae: Angiospermae: Dicotyledons: Asparagales: Orchidaceae: Caladenia
    Matt Campbell says

    Tamara suggests Caladenia tentaculata due to how far back the flower sits but she says she's not 100% sure so I have left it at genus for now. Quite a lot were found along the couple of km's of trail we walked.

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  • Reiner Richter 4 January 2017
    Caladenia dilatata
    (species)
    Taxonomy: Plantae: Angiospermae: Dicotyledons: Asparagales: Orchidaceae: Caladenia: dilatata
    Common Names: Orchid family, Green-combed Spider Orchid, Fringed Spider Orchid, Green-comb Spider Orchid, Green Spider Orchid, Green Comb Spider Orchid, Green Spider, Fringed Mantis Orchid
    Reiner Richter says

    I think its dilatata going by how clubbed the lateral sepal are and its a late species compared to tentaculata.

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Notes

  • Matt Campbell 5 January 2017
    Tagged With thanks reiner tamara
    Matt Campbell says

    Thank you to both of you for your help on this one. I didn't consult my one and only orchid book because it's too general and only lists common species. But then I'd forgotten that I'd bought the ebook from Gary Backhouse. I just looked in there and here's what he has to say: The green-comb spider-orchids comprise a distinctive group with predominantly green and red flowers. The labellum is green with a maroon apex and lamina calli, sometimes with a white band bordering the maroon apex, and has short to long marginal teeth (margins rarely smooth). The tepals are green with variable red median striping, and usually tipped with short to long distinctly thickened brown to yellow clubs densely covered with immersed glands. This group comprises about 40 species occurring right across southern Australia. Within the group there are three loose sub-groups: - Caladenia dilatata sub-group comprising most of the group, with small to large flowers with short to long, pointed, marginal teeth; - Caladenia concinna sub-group comprising eight species all with small flowers with very short, blunt, marginal teeth; - Caladenia integra sub-group with just two species, both with large flowers with mostly smooth labellum margins lacking teeth.

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  • Tamara Leitch 5 January 2017
    Tagged With ta
    Tamara Leitch says

    Thank you, Reiner, for pointing out the differences. I hadn't considered that one, only C. tentaculata and C. parva, because I was referring to the Orchids of East Gippsland book which doesn't list C. dilatata (odd because there are plenty of records down there on ALA), and a search of the location on ALA for Caladenia didn't bring up C. dilatata (although now searching for the species did).

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  • Matt Campbell 5 January 2017
    Tagged With coast
    Matt Campbell says

    Russell, that fits in perfectly with these specimens as many were only 4 to 5m above the hide tide line. It's beside an estuary with quite large tides and reasonably sheltered due to the coastal scrub that extends right to the high tide mark. There would have been several hundred varying from some quite fresh examples to others that were most definitely past their prime.

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  • Reiner Richter 5 January 2017
    Tagged With orchids ala
    Reiner Richter says

    Orchids on ALA are cactus with many orphan species floating around not link to a genus (or family) so they gets missed in a genus search, like I'm guessing you did.

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  • Russell Stanley 5 January 2017
    Tagged With dilatata
    Russell Stanley says

    The key is the flowering date and the petals. C dilatata is generally a late spring, early summer flowering species that is usually solitary. A key to the ID is that they usually have a thickening (club) on the end of the petals (usually minor compared to the sepals). Looking at the second photo you can clearly see this glandular thickening on the tips of the back-swept petals. This species appears to be fairly rare and - maybe because not many people are out and about at the time they flower. Most sightings are fairly close (within anout 100km) to the coast, though I have seen one in the Southern Grampians at Glenisla. Because of the late flowering, the leaf of the plant is often withered at flowering. A similar species from S.A. is C necrophylla (dead leaf) which looks much the same as C dilatata but usually grows on limestone soils.

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